Showing posts with label Spacecase. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Spacecase. Show all posts

Jan 21, 2019

RUBBER BLANKET "New Garbage Truck" 7inch


Comprised of Lars Finberg (A-Frames/Intelligence) and Jun Ohnuki & Brad Eberhard of Wounded Lion, Rubber Blanket isn't just the punchline to a sick burn that's best served at summer camp. It's also something that makes for waggish reverberations.

There's an ingenuous sense of wonder for the day to day mundane going on lyrically on this. Over a Warm Jets-ish Eno kinda thing that sounds like its sense of balance is corrupted and a melody of just a few notes, "New Garbage Truck" bounces about in an odd way while giving a detailed account of the newest trash hauler being spotted in the neighborhood.

It's flip, "Pedestrian Walkway", is about, the faces and things you see when while afoot in the city. A spartan synthy stroll which accompanies it helps keep thoughts chipper even if the crowd around is vexatious.
Go for a stroll at Spacecase Records

Oct 29, 2018

BLOODBAGS Sinister Deeds 7inch


The smearing of vital fluids that New Zealand's Bloodbags do all over this glob of wax is not for the chicken-livered.

Burly and brusque, slashes of jagged guitars flail and flash like a craggy blade in front of  broken down drums that sound like their being beaten with the firewood logs on "Elder Statesmen." Thoughts of Wire's Pink Flag come to mind but there is more of a feeling of having your head held down in an old metal barrel full of tiger milk. The howl of desperation in Andrew Tolley's voice does not sound like it is going to break into a dissertation of Barnett Newman's work or something of the sort either.

The ride that's "Dark Room Dick" is one on a rigid suspension, down some rocky roads that the ilk of the Honeymoon Killers and the Scientists trudged across using only the distant sound of war drums and the scent of death in the air as road maps.
Get transfused at Spacecase

Aug 27, 2018

CHRISTOPHER ALAN DURHAM Slow Drain 7inch


I am not familiar with Christopher Alan Durham's previous bands Roachclip, The Bibs or Church Shuttle. Because of that, I am also not sure in which "Downriver" Michigan community (there are 18 of them) he committed these two songs on to a Tascam 4-track in so I can't compare how it measures to them.

Having spent a fair amount of time in Wyandotte, the 5th largest downriver town population wise best known for the steel mills that provided the early American auto industry with the metal to build cars (the 2nd largest in population Downriver community is Lincoln Park. It's best known as the place where the MC5 first got in fights with each other at a malt shop parking lot and then formed a band) the past half-decade or so due to family connections though, and the apparitional spaces where it sounds like this record dwells, I am thinking I need to become more acquainted with both.

Specters of Skip Spence's Oar, Pink Reason's Cleaning The Mirror, Daniel Johnston's songs from the A Texas Trip cassette and the most clattering and skittish of NZ bands loom heavy here.

On "Day and Age" and it's b-side "For Many Years" fragile guitar strums somewhat inattentively provide an anchor for Durham's slumberous drawl. Odd intonations from an organ and harmonium along with the occasional crack of a drum flit and float through the proceedings sounding ghostly and distant. It's the kind of record to play in the wee hours when in an introspective mood or a want for late night paranoia.
Get haunted at Spacecase

Jul 9, 2018

JEFFREY EVANS and ROSS JOHNSON "Caldonia" 7inch


When Baron Ross Johnson and Monsuier Jeffrey Evans hang out, it is anyone's guess as to what kind of devilry may happen. Bad jokes and tales of misspent youth are common and a spilled drink of some sort is not unexpected. It also usually leads to music being made.

Reverberating like they recorded this at the bottom of a handle of Dickel No. 8, the two bang away at two deep south folk standards, mangling something that has been heard done a billion ways into something ripped bare and bleeding. If you're familiar with the Original Panther Burns single that Spacecase released a few months back, this has the same stripped-down hanging out in a living room feel. The difference though is that the record Ross did with Tav sounds like a dapper afternoon. This is very late night and rumpled.

"Caldonia" gets battered and then left for dead in an auto salvage yard. Backward and blanging blues bite from Mr. Evans six strings as he howls, while Mr. Johnson taps and whacks a rhythm that paces a path only it knows. Sounding like he's using trash cans lids as cymbals, the metallic crash and rattle give the whole thing a before there was an Einst├╝rzende Neubauten there were hillbillies.

"Cotton Fields" bursts out, gets all wobbly, breaks down and then falls into an oddly shaped pocket and then catches a countryside stride. The only thing missing was a choir of barroom angels to join in on the chorus.
Order a round at Spacecase Records

Feb 15, 2018

STRAIGHT ARROWS "Out and Down" 7inch


I've heard the name of Australia's Straight Arrows mentioned quite a few times over the last decade or so. Somehow though, I have never actually consciously HEARD them til this recently released two songer on Spacecase Records.

There's a durability in the way some bands can have guitars wring and twist Byrdsian chimes into curious, different new shapes. "Out and Down" is one of those kinds of songs that does that thing. Wrap a blanket of fuzz around that mutated jangle, add a swing that's well adept in both stomp & way. Then dip it in a light & chilly mist of echo. Don't worry about it getting too icy though. The heat coming off of Owen Penglis' bratty bellow practically starts a fire.

If side one is a piece of hazy and wiggly psych punk that provides a ying, side two's ditty celebrating the idea of being a small business owner that still has to answer to a corporate office,"Franchisee" is a garage punk hop around that works as a quick and smart-alecky yang.

Get a shot of it at Spacecase Records

Dec 2, 2017

THE ORIGINAL PANTHER BURNS "Rock Me" 7inch


What started as a performance art thing to confuse and confound the Memphis intelligentsia and uptights alike in 1979, Panther Burns have been around for close to four decades now. Over all that time, the people in the band back Tav Falco have changed many times as has the music, slithering through a gamut of weirdo rockabilly and the swampiest of rock to eventually stabs at the great American songbook and straight up tango music.

If one wants to hear something close as they can to something that sounds like the ORIGINAL Panther Burns lineup that's happening in the right here/right now, most would probably not expect to hear it would be from two of cats from that original trio (the third being LX who of course has been gone from this world since 2000) but here we are.

Recorded in one day, this is sound of two old souls hanging out in a laidback setting and laying it down unadorned and pure. The Baron Ross Johnson's work on the traps is lackadaisically sublime as it has ever been, keeping time in a loose manner and always putting booms and crashes where many might not think they belong but they definately do when he does it. Tav's guitar work sounds like the south. Swamps and hills. Humidity and pig fat. It all comes out in the snakey blues string work and his croon is just as blurry eyed and velvelty as his devotees dug it for decades.
Get it from Spacecase Records.

Sep 7, 2017

The New Existentialists "Elton John" 7inch EP


Growing up sorta in the middle of nowhere, Flying Nun bands were like getting audio pen pals from a place that was familiar yet so distant and mystifying. In the early 90's though, I'd had grown out of touch with the label's tangible dispatches so I can't really compare the differences and similarities between what New Existentialist George D. Henderson has going on here and what he was up to in his other combo the Puddle.

Sleepy eyed in tempo "Elton John" finds daydreams about listening to records and singing along in a wistful and maundering tone. Guitars sibilate a trademark NZ misshapen jangle that dates back to at least the Clean and while a synth emanates a blurting a wobbly mist.


The ghost of Syd and perhaps a specter of, say, the Television Personalities hangs over the band sound without intruding too much. Sure, there's a common whimsical melancholiness in the sort of psych-pop that no doubt stitches them all together, but the bouncing and squishy trip into the earth that's side two's "Mystery Of The Worm" has them loping down their own leafy path.
Snag it at Spacecase Records

Apr 14, 2017

JAMES ARTHUR'S MANHUNT "Staring At The Sun" 7inch

When James Arthur's album of last year, Digital Clubbing, came out I was pretty dang excited to hear it. As a fan of the type of noise James has made since first hearing the Fireworks back in the mid-90's and dug everything he has been a part of since, along fact that it had been over five years since anything, you could even go as far as saying I was chomping at the bit for new music from him. And when my ears landed on the record, they were not disappointed in the least.

Then I started thinking "Is the world going to have to wait ANOTHER five years to hear more new stuff from him?" As of this moment with the release of this new single though, that seems to not be the case.

Under the knob twiddling of Stuart Sikes, who's CV includes working as the engineer on albums ranging from Loretta Lynn, The Polyphonic Spree and the Promise Ring to the Reigning Sound, the Sword and Cat Power,  James and his Manhunters blast their sonic power to higher highs and crank out two unobvious covers.

On one side, there's the Angry Samoans "Staring At The Sun." Originally appearing on an album that confused to flat out pissed punk rockers when it came out for sounding, well...a bit more "mature" than the ones before it, STP Not LSD, the song was the psychedelic jam on that record. With guitar twang specializing in slasher flick splatter, a rhythm section adept in beat downs, creepy echo'd vocals and notions of riding a rocket straight into the middle of the huge flaming orange ball, it's downright disturbing take of the song that may even get me to bust out the original and reassess my opinion on it. I mean, it's been at least 25 years since I last listened to it.

The flip finds a take on "Cherry Red" by the Groundhogs. Always a bunch more weird, off and interesting on their approach than their Brit blues rock peers of their time, covering a Groundhogs song actually makes sense for James, even if most wouldn't ever think about it else wise. Things get even more mutated on this version. Something like Hawkwind getting grounded up and mixed in with some masa flour and then fried in ZZ Top grease.
Get it at www.spacecaserecords.com