Showing posts with label 60's soul. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 60's soul. Show all posts

Apr 18, 2016

Carol Anderson "I'm Not Worried"


     One of the things about these lost Detroit soul records of the 60′s is finding out a little history on the label and especially the singers and players that appeared on them. Little slivers of info from here and there sometimes lead into a trove of history. Other times a lot of things remain a mystery.
     Located at 5725 14th Street in Detroit, the Whip record label was ran by a fellow who’s name might have been James Davis or Jim Riley. The address was also the same for another label called Dotty’s that was owned by a cat known as Clifford Marshall. To add even more confusion both labels also used the exact same catalog numbering system and we releasing records around the same time frame. It has been speculated that they were all just the same person operating under different names for possibly different (perhaps even nefarious) reasons. The name C. Marshall appears as both a songwriter and producer here so until someone who actually knows a bit more about the whole situation comes a long (as I am just a fan really. My historian research hat only fits rarely) I am gonna assume they all different personas for whatever reason.
     Carol Anderson was the third record to come out on the Whip label. The a-side, the horn laden and smoky mid tempo’d "Taking Mind Of My Love", is no stranger to Northern Soul fans but we’re gonna listen to the flip. To me it’s just got a hotter bump to it and I dig the sass and the way she sing “Oohhh Yeah!” in it.
     In the late 60′s and early 70′s Carol also released records on the Mid Town, Explosion and Soul “O” Sonic label. It has been noted that those labels were started by her mother, Esse Anderson, who was a hairdresser as well as Carol’s manager. All three labels (as well as the hairdressing business) were based out of their home at 443 Navhoe St. in Detroit. Esse also has songwriting and production credits on the records that Carol sang on through the 70′s
     Esse passed away from a bout with cancer in 1983. Carol died just a year later.

Nov 6, 2014

Steve Mancha "Monday Through Thursday"

   
     Originally from South Carolina, Steve Mancha (real name is Clyde Wilson) and his family moved to Detroit around 1954. By the early 60s he had recorded for Harvey Fuqua's HPC and had Barry Gordy showing interest in him his career wasn't taking off.
     In 1965, producer Don Davis signed him to his Wheelsville label. His first record for the label was "Did My Baby Call?" It didn't see much airplay action but in '66, with Edwin Star and JJ Barnes, recording the under the name the Holidays (a name which Davis owned and though there was an actual group he had by that name none of the members appeared on the record) scored a top 40 hit with "I'll Love You, Forever" on Golden World records.
     When Davis started back up the label he originally had going in 1963, Groovesville, in 1966, Mancha was the first one to have something released on the label, "You're Still In My Heart" in May of that year. He would record five singles for the label over the next year including this Friday themed one, "Monday Through Saturday" (incidentally the A-side of this particular record is called "Friday Night". I could have picked either side to spotlight on as their both great but this is I heard first years ago so that's why I went for it.) None of them did much outside of Detroit but are still big faves with the Northern Soul crowd.
     Mancha did find later success though as lead singer in 100 Proof Aged In Soul. He would also become a big part of the Detroit gospel scene up until his death in January of 2011.

Oct 7, 2014

Bettye LaVette "What Condition My Condition Is In"

In 1968 Bettye LaVette went into the studio to record a second set of sides with Detroit producer Ollie McLaughlin for his label Karen Record. Backed by Dennis Coffey, Ray Monette and Bob Babbitt they cut the Popcorn Wylie and Tony Hester song "Get Away" with it's intention of it being the hit side of an upcoming release on McLaughin's Karen label.

For the b-side they recorded "What Condition My Condition Is In." Written by Mickey Newbury, the song, which was actually titled "Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)" was a country hit for Jerry Lee Lewis in 1967 as a honky tonk oddity. A year later the song went into the Billboard top 10 as a bubblegum psychedelic tune by Kenny Rogers and the First Edition.

McLaughlin was confident in Bettye's ability to turn the song into a smoldering and funky Rhythm and Blues track and claim the song her own. Detroit radio DJ's must've thought so too because though the a-side was ignored, "What Condition My Condition Is In" hit the top 10 on the charts of the legendary Detroit R&B station WCHB in February of 1969.

Sep 7, 2014

Little Ann “Going Down A One Way Street (the Wrong Way)”

  
     Here’s a hot slab of horn heavy funky soul from the Motor City. Born in Chicago,  Anne "Little Ann" Bridgeforth recorded a slew of track for Detroit producer Dave Hamilton before having this song picked up by the Ric Tic label in 1969. “Going  Down A One Way Street (the Wrong Way)”  was the only 45 released in the US by her (and she only got the A side too. The flipside was taken by an instrumental ‘I’d Like To Know You Better’, credited to Ric Tic’s owner Wingate).
     In the late 80’s a couple of soul aficionados were visiting Hamilton and going through the many reels of tape he had. One of those reels included Ann’s unreleased recordings. Some of those songs started appearing on British label Ace record compilations in the 90’s, introducing her to a new audience as well as being flown over to the  UK to play for adoring fans before passing away in 2003.
     In 2009, Finland based label Timmion label released an entire album of Little Ann tracks under the name Deep Shadows.

Jul 4, 2014

Jackie Lee "Anything You Want"



     Jackie Lee (Born Earl Nelson in Lake Charles, LA) had quite a career though a bit a puzzle to piece it all together.  Recording solo R&B tracks under the names Jay Dee, Earl Cosby and Chip Nelson as well as a  member of many different R&B and Doo Wop groups before settling on his most well-known nom de plum , Lee’s first hit was singing lead on Bobby Byrd's Hollywood Flames “Buzz, Buzz, Buzz” (a song that Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers covered in 1978) which went to #18 on the pop charts in 1958.
      In 1964, as part of the duo Bob and Earl, he had another top 40 hit in the charts with “Harlem Shuffle”. The song found even bigger success in the UK when it was issued there in 1969 reaching #7.
      In 1965, recording under the name Jackie Lee (Jackie was Earl's wife's name and Lee his own middle name) he hit #14 on the charts with the novelty dance number “The Duck.” This track, “Anything You Want”, was recorded in 1968 and was slated to be released on the Mirwood label under the name Earl Nelson that year didn’t see the light of day til UK reissue label released it on the The Mirwood Soul Story CD compilation in 2005.

Jun 18, 2014

Edd Henry "You're Replacement Is Here"


   
     "No more heartaches/No more sorrows"
     Here’s a very hard to find Detroit groover from 1966 on the Big Mack label by Edd Henry. It’s a song of being done wrong and having enough of it. Recorded at the legendary United Sound with a hot band this records swings. It received no local airplay of note. Would’ve been a hit in a better world.
     The a-side of this, a soul burner in it’s own right called “Crooked Woman" (it seems Edd had his share of women treating him wrong), showed up in an episode of Mad Man some seasons back.
     The Big Mack label released records sporadically through the mid 60’s to the early 70’s. It’s offices operated at several different addresses though the years but operated out this location during the time this record was released. You can find both sides of the single and other Big Mack Records tracks on the Numero Group’s Eccentric Soul compilation devoted to the label.
     Edd Henry recorded several funk sides for the Heavy Hank label, including this sticky bop, in the late 60’s/early 70’s and released a gospel album in the mid 80’s.