Jan 17, 2014

DANNY & THE DARLEANS s/t LP

     “I’m really into the idea of garage rock as folk music. It was the folk music of 60′s teenagers. Anybody can do it.”
     Anyone with more than just a casual history of of rock-n-roll could make such a statement. Especially someone who has a band that harkens back to sound of the youth explosion of nearly five decades ago. It's such a quote that could easily just viewed as some sort of idealism or romanticism of the past if said by most people.
     When such a thing is said by Dan Kroha though, who has not only been making the such glorious & soulful racket for 20 years, first as one third of one of the most influential bands of it's sort with the Gories, and then continuing to keep things just a primitive and even more sexy with the Demolition Dollrods, it's a statement of a passionate relationship for the bump, grind, grunt and wail.
     Unlike some "moderne garage" bands who record in good studio and then do things like bathe the mix in (digital) reverb and other things to make it all sound lo-fi in attempts to have the listener think that it's all being kept authentic-this album has a pure rawness that feels natural. Instead of going into somewhere fancy and then doing things to make it appear all trashy-the Darleans sound like they did the exact opposite by recording on equipment that may leave a little to be desired as far as fidelity and outdated as far as technology is concerned but making the best and most rockin' sounding record they could. The results are one rockin' house party that keeps shakin' til the sun comes up.
    The album kicks off  like a rocket shot of blaring punk rock/R&B stomp with "Don't Get In The Car". It ends twelve songs later with the flash fires of feedback on "Can't Kill The Rooster". In between those two points the 3-piece band (Kroha on guitar and vocals, along with sometime Detroit Cobras Rich Wohllfeil on skins and Colleen Burke holding down the low end) can be found mixing gasoline with Kool Aid for the handclap heavy & funky take on the Strangeloves "It's About My Baby" and the sweet tart hip shakin' hooks of "Where The Rubber Meets The Road" & "Boo-De-Lye", being forlorn and fed up on the slow burnings "How Many Times"and "You Treated Me Bad" and bouncing around in funhouse of broken mirrors take on Lou Reed's pre-Velvet Underground tune "You're Driving Me Insane."
     Garage rock as folk music? Perhaps. A record that brings on a no holds barred, no bullshit rock-n-roll party? A definite yes!      
http://www.neros-neptune.com

Jan 12, 2014

HEAVY LIDS "Gravity Reverse" 7inch

     How do spacemen crash to earth and not be detected?
     Especially when it sounds like the spaceship they arrived in was made of very tossed away cassette deck parts & discarded reels of of really low budget 60's sci-fi films and rattles louder than an old pick-up truck with no muffler and rusted out box panels.
     Featuring ex-Detonations and Static Static folks and resembling something akin to deep down south and rusty razor blade toting bastard offspring of intergalactic guitar feedback noise humpers that proceeded them in decades past-the two songs here are not like painting a room midnight blue and pasting glow in the dark stars, moons and planets all over the walls. Instead, they are like lightning flashes or chemical flares as the songs go straight to dishing out parts of the frontal lobe with a spoon and then onto probing other orifices.
     Creepy organ blow out a noxious green fog that covers the ground, electric shock guitar send a billion watts of paralyzing jolts down the spine and singing that doesn't sound like it's going to ask you to take them to you leader but is going to demand to know where the nearest power plant is.
pelicanpowwowrecords.bigcartel.com

Jan 10, 2014

VACATION CLUB "Daydream" 7inch

     When it comes to what us Michiganders call pop (you may call it soda, or, if down south "Cokes" no matter what the flavor or brand is) my tastebuds don't like it too fluffy.
     There's gotta be something something sour and gives it that particular pucker. Something that is more than just a whole bunch of frosting to cover up that the base & bulk is just another usual glob of high fructose corn syrup.
     "Daydream", a-side of Indianapolis, Indiana's Vacation Club latest single, is like lemon pop. It's crystalline and fizzy but tartness that is like real lemon instead of made in a lab and pure cane sugar for that proper hyper buzz.
     Then things get interesting. Like fresh scrubbed faces get dosed on reverb and other undisclosed things that make 'em feel all wiggly and wander down backstreets kind of interesting.
     A floor tom favoring jungle garage thump anchors boozy harmony heavy vocals while blurred guitars with a love for the solos on the Velvet Underground's "What Goes On" splatter rings of stickiness everywhere else.
     For the flip "Forest Babe" it's Saturday morning cartoons gets a snotty punkin' 'tude on. Like a wad of bubblegum on the sidewalk on a hot summer day-it's florescent & gooey and a gritty and full of insects. It ends up being in the same whimsy places some of thee Oh Sees and the Black Lips tunes go but finds it distorted view to get there. 
http://randyrecords.blogspot.com

Jan 5, 2014

Founders Brewing Comany's Imperial Stout

     The weather forecast is calling for one of the most major snowstorms the region has seen in some years. Of course though these days if 2 inches drop it causes the every area TV station to post "STORM TRACKER ALERTS" and so on causing some type of hype and scare-mania for what is just an everyday run of the mill Michigan winter snowfall.
     None the less, errands and a trek was made to the store for a few things needed in case the weather actually hindered getting out on the roads over the next few days. On my final stop I spotted these Imperial Stouts on the shelf. Knowing their powers from many past years when they make their winter appearance I know that IF we did actually get the snow the weather folk were banging out about these beers would be something to warm me as I watched a tundra happen out my windows.
     This is one of the darkest beers ever. It looks and pours pretty much like old motor oil. Save from a dark ruby color along the sides of the glass no light gets through this brew. The head is a sliver of bubbly mocha color that, though thin, leaves a fair amount of lacing behind in it's wake.
     Cocoa, coffee and vanilla notes are what comes through first on the nose. None of them come out blasting in scent. Instead, they are all mellow and roasty as they intermingle with each other. Just beneath them are hints of charred maple, vanilla and tobacco. Very warm and soothing-which is to say it is already starting to do it's trick as I am watching the snow starting to pile up and watching the thermometer dropping down.
     Tastebuds become immersed in dark coffee and bittersweet chocolate flavors at first sip. They hold strong through the soft & chewy nature of the beer but also give room for dints of raspberry, vanilla and hardwood smoke. Towards the finish, where a lot of bold stouts seem will drift off into either a watery sweetness or spent coffee, this takes a bold turn with a piney hop bite and a reminder that even though the 10.5% abv has been well hidden beneath ten varieties of malted barley it still packs a punch.
     Damn! It is starting to look really monochromatic outside. Maybe the television wasn't actually over-exaggerating the mess this storm is gonna make. Good thing I found a store with this in stock as it is one of the most hearty things ever for such weather nuisances.
foundersbrewing.com